Aging Well in America–Healthy Living 2.0

Free event for people over the age of 50 on ways to live well, longer in our community!

arthur murray

* Healthy Food Choices
* Aging Life Care Management
* Making it to 100

* Dance Lesson by Sean Offer
* Get moving & have fun!

The community resource table will be available.

Our events are educational.  Leave your checkbook at home!
Seating is limited. Reserve your spot by calling 813 949 0752 or email: brenda@SeniorInformationResources.org

 

Getting Well and Staying Healthy

Dieting is a sprint…lifestyle is a marathon. You can be well and remain healthy by consuming food that is good for you. Here are some easy tips for staying healthy.

1. Keep ‘stock’ foods in the pantry:
Examples:
Canned fruit, tuna fish, peanut butter, dried legumes, oatmeal,
whole grain cereals & crackers, pasta, rice, marinara sauce, parmalat
milk, almond, coconut milk in carton.

2. Keep ‘stock’ food in freezer.
Examples:
Frozen vegetables, variety of fruit that can be thawed. bread or other baked goods.

3. Prepare meals in advance:
Double up when cooking meats: poultry, lamb, red meat, and pork.
Get out your crock-pot! Make soups, stews. bean soup, or chili.

4. Separate meals into single servings and freeze for later use.

5. Eat at least 2-3 servings of fruit daily, preferably fresh, frozen or canned in its own juice (not syrup).

6. Consume unlimited vegetables. These can be eaten as salads, soups, or as a side item with a meal.
Try dipping fresh zucchini or squash in a light dressing or hummus for a snack.

7. Eat several small meals during the day instead of one large meal.
This> helps to control weight and blood sugars.

8. Breakfast is king! Your body needs energy after eight hours without nourishment.
Never skip the morning meal, especially if taking medications.
It is recommended to consume fiber with your breakfast.
Examples of fiber containing foods:
Fruit, vegetables, legumes (dried beans), flax seed, chia seed,oatmeal, whole grains.
Fiber goal: 20-30 grams daily

9. If diabetic, always consume a protein with a carbohydrate.
It is imperative that you take your blood glucose (sugar) at least once a day.
Do not skip meals. Consume breakfast, lunch, and dinner along with at least 2-3 snacks.

10. Consume at least 6-8 glasses of fluid daily. This can be decaf coffee, green/black tea, and water.
Remember: Caffeinated beverages are dehydrating.

If your mouth is dry it is usually an indication of dehydration; so bottoms up with the water bottle.

Barb M. Mahlmeister RDN, IFMCP
Certified Functional Dietitian
Natural Choice Nutrition

Do your prescriptions decrease your nutrients?

If you watch any TV at all, you probably know that taking statins –medication to lower your cholesterol — also lowers your Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) levels. But did you know that if you’re also taking antidepressants, they do the same, as well as lower vitamin B2? Coenzyme Q10 is an antioxidant that helps cells protect against damage. Low levels of C0Q10 weaken the immune system, leaving you with low energy levels. If you are taking a statin or a red yeast rice supplement your CoQ10 levels should be monitored.

Taking antihypertensive medications for high blood pressure depletes other nutrients, including vitamin B1, B6, and zinc. Antacids, another huge million-dollar seller depletes vitamin B12, folic acid, vitamin D, calcium, iron and zinc. If you read the label on most antacids, they caution you not to take longer than a few months, even though many people use them for years. Talk to your health care practitioner about possible underlining issues.

Oral contraceptives, which most of the younger women take for many years, deplete vitamin B1, B2, B3, B6, B12, folic acid, vitamin C, magnesium, selenium and zinc.

Anti-inflammatories such as corticosteroids and prednisone deplete calcium, magnesium, zinc, selenium, chromium, vitamin D, vitamin C and B vitamins. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDS, such as Motrin, Advil, Aleve, etc., decrease folic acid.

With the rise in diabetes, many people are on a popular drug called Metformin. Metformin depletes CoQ10, vitamin B12 and folic acid.

Antibiotics including penicillin lower vitamin K and B vitamins, while tetracyclines deplete calcium, magnesium, iron, vitamin B6 and zinc. Antibiotics do just what they are named for—they are antibacterial, eliminating most of the bad and good bacteria in your gastrointestinal tract. They may also cause bloating, gas, decreased digestion and absorption. A probiotic will repopulate your gastrointestinal tract with good bacteria.

Eating a healthy diet including fish, poultry, lean meat, legumes and 11 servings of vegetables and fruit, will provide many of the vitamins and minerals that are imperative for your body to function. When taking any of the above medications, discuss monitoring your vitamin and mineral levels with your health care practitioner and supplement if necessary.ncn

Barb Mahlmeister, Dietitian Nutritionist
Barb Mahlmeister, Dietitian Nutritionist